Interpreting crosstabs | Statwing

Interpreting crosstabs

When you choose to relate two Categories to each other, Statwing produces a “crosstab”. Below is one such crosstab, from a survey of 10,000 software developers, showing the relationship between the size of the company at which they work and their job satisfaction:

Crosstab Explanation - Column2

Of developers at companies with 1,000 to 3,000 employees, 20.9% say they love their job.

 

Initially, each column in the crosstab sums to 100%. So, of developers at companies with 1,000 to 3,000 employees, 20.9% say they love their job.

Above we asked, “Of developers in companies of 1,000 to 3,000, what percent love their job?” We can also reverse the question, asking “Of developers who love their job, what percent are in companies of 1,000 to 3,000?”

To answer that question, select “Row %” from the options above the chart, and the table will change to this:

Crosstab Explanation - Row2

Of developers who love their job, 5% are at companies with 1,000 to 3,000 employees.

 

Of developers who love their job, 5% are at companies with 1,000 to 3,000 employees. Depending on your data, one or the other ways of looking at the data may be more interesting. If you were a developer trying to choose how large a company to work for, you’d probably be most curious about which size has the highest proportion of its developers loving their job, so you’d be more interested in the first table, the “Col %” table.

Of course, by selecting “Count” you can see the same table as just the number of developers in each group:

Crosstab Explanation - Count2

93 developers who responded to the survey were in companies of 1,000 to 3,000 and loved their job.

 

Or you can also see that number a proportion of the total number of developers surveyed:

Crosstab Explanation - All2

1.4% of the developers surveyed were in companies of 1,000 to 3,000 and loved their job.

 

The green and red arrows indicate cells that are statistically significantly lower or higher than expected. That is to say, if there was no relationship between size of company and levels of job satisfaction, you would not expect to see such a high number of developers at very small companies that love their job. Cells can contain up to three arrows, indicating varying degrees of statistical significance.

Another way to think of what those arrows mean:

  • If you have the table sorted by “Col %” (the default, and the top chart above), green arrows mean “The percentage in this cell is statistically significantly higher than the percentage across the other cells in this row“. So in the first chart, you could say “Respondents at companies with 1-25 employees are statistically significantly more likely to say they ‘Love their job’ than respondents at other companies (e.g., the 36.7% is statistically significantly higher than the other cells in that row).”
  • If you have the table sorted by “Row %” (the second chart above), green arrows mean “The percentage in this cell is statistically significantly higher than the percentage across the other cells in this column“. So in the second chart, you could say “Respondents who say they ‘love their job’ are statistically significantly more likely to work at companies with 1-25 employees than respondents who have some other level of job satisfaction (e.g., the 47.8% is statistically significantly higher than the other cells in that column).”

For more details, see our crosstab technical notes.